The process of how to achieve a good logo

 

In an earlier blog about designing an effective business logo, I touched on the creative process I follow to arrive at options for your brand identity.

Creating a visual identity for a business or product doesn’t just happen in the blink of an eye; it’s something that produces an outcome at the end of a deliberate process, even if I have no idea where it’s going to end up!

Let me walk you through my process

 

Step 1: checking out the competition

Why do this? I want to look at the visible profile of your business competition with the aim of creating a brand personality that is totally different in your marketplace.

We want you to be noticed afterall!

 

Step 2: mind mapping

Mind mapping helps me to consider as many different design directions as possible.

It involves word association – I branch out from the word that’s central to the design brief, writing down other words that spring to mind.

From this, I form a large thought cloud that gives me a strong reference point for the next stage of the process.

 

Step 3: words become sketches

My mind mapping words generate ideas and I start to associate these words with images.

I highlight the words which adapt well to sketching and begin to draw things. This helps me to focus on the stronger ideas.

I then relate the words to shapes.

 

Step 4: from pencil sketches to a digital reality

The concepts I’ve drawn in the previous step are now turned into digital imagery.

This involves the most time to achieve a good overall balance between images and fonts.

 

Step 5: survival of the fittest designs

I generate quite a lot of digital designs, but only three are selected. Selection involves a range of factors, including feedback from creative people whose opinion I value.

Only the strongest graphic concepts survive, because my clients deserve the best.

 

Step 6: colouring your opinion

I then work some colour into the surviving concepts. It’s important that each concept is presented to the client in the same colours.

This ensures their final logo selection is not influenced by their preference of colour – I want them to focus on the logo concept.

 

So there you have it, the recipe to arriving at a great design.

A lot of effort goes into every successful identity project.

When you next see logo design being offered at a cheap price, it’s highly unlikely the designer has put themselves through a rigorous process like the one I’ve just described.

Like anything in life, you get what you pay for at the end of the day.

 

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